ESCO Digital — We work with individuals and clients to boil down their message into a single sound bite. For 2017 we're excited to share with you 365 of them — one sound bite each day that effectively conveys a message and leaves a lasting impression.

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StoryCorps

I was worried that you liked me as a girl.
— Gabe López

 

A single statement that says so much. Eight-year-old Gabe came into StoryCorps with his mother Chris to discuss how a camp for transgender youth transformed his life. "[Y]ou can tell me anything, anytime, anywhere, and it won't change how much I love you. I'll always have your back," she replied to him. Listen at storycorps.org.

061/365
Terrible, Thanks for Asking

It’s not a cancer story, it’s a love story. With some cancer.
— Nora McInerny, creator of the 'Terrible, Thanks for Asking' podcast

During an interview with NPR, Nora McInerny spoke about the loss of her father, husband, and unborn child—whom she lost all within the span of a few weeks. Today's sound bite comes from that audio clip. Needless to say, it's a bit of a tear jerker. 

Subscribe to Nora McInerny's podcast 'Terrible, Thanks for Asking' on iTunes.

060/365

TEDSummit

You’re one of fewer than 2,000 Americans who has ever given a kidney to a stranger. What is it that makes you so special?
— Abigail Marsh, psychologist

Many science talks are difficult to follow. From the passive voice of the studies to the topics alone, it's difficult to know why research findings matter to us, our environment, and our world. Psychologist Abigail Marsh knows this, and, in her TEDSummit talk 'Why some people are more altruistic than others', Marsh expertly uses storytelling to keep the audience invested in her research.

Halfway through the talk, Marsh asks the question that she asks every one of her study subjects: "You're one of fewer than 2,000 Americans who has ever given a kidney to a stranger. What is it that makes you so special?"

It's a question meant for her study subjects, but in this talk, her study subjects are the audience. And each one is dying to answer her. 

059/365

Hedley & Bennett

There are so many details to an apron, you’d think we’re building rockets here.
— Ellen Bennett, founder of Hedley & Bennett

Ellen Bennet's Instagram photos were one of my favorite things on the Internet—until I heard this juxtaposing line from her Do Lectures USA talk. 

Watch the full video of her journey founding Hedley & Bennett, an LA-based custom apron and chefware company.

057/365

THINX

Holy shit, we’re alive.
— Miki Agrawal, Founder of THINX

The CEO and co-founder of THINX, Miki Agrawal created a high-tech underwear solution for women to wear during their periods. By day, she leads the team and works with AFRIpads in Uganda to fund reusable cloth pads for millions of girls. And on one day in particular, she delivered this DO Lectures USA talk on breaking taboos and living our twenty-one thousand days.

Talk about inspiring. 

055/365
VSCO

Sometimes creativity doesn’t look like a palm tree against a white wall with a coffee and holding a Kinfolk Magazine—which is totally cool if that’s your thing. Creativity comes in all different forms and from all kinds of perspectives.
— Greg Lutze, Co-Founder and Chief Creative Officer of VSCO

I shouted, "Yes!" when I heard this line. Listen to Greg Lutze's masterful Creative Mornings Louisville talk on the most defining moments of starting his business. 

052/365
Chef's Table

Umami is a necessary component to living.
— Ivan Orkin

Today's #365SoundBite comes from season three of Chef's Table, a Netflix documentary series that recently landed in our queue. We're only two episodes into the series but already two homemade pizzas down. Perhaps it is the cinematopgrahy that inspires our newfound love of cooking, but more likely it is the storytelling and chefs' sound bites that move us to pick up a whisk. Episode four features Ivan Orkin, a born and raised New Yorker who turned a decades-long passion for Japanese culture into a thriving career as a ramen star. Spend ten minutes with Orkin, and you'll see why umami is life's secret ingredient.

Watch Chef's Table on Netflix.

051/365
First Lady's Final Remarks

You see, our glorious diversity — our diversities of faiths and colors and creeds — that is not a threat to who we are, it makes us who we are.
— Michelle Obama

Seems only right to celebrate #PresidentsDay with a favorite sound bite from our future president. Read the full transcript of Michelle Obama's Final Remarks as First Lady on TIME.

no. 51 of #365SoundBites We Love

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Syria Deeply

We need to embrace complexity if we want to make sense of a complex world.
— Lara Setrakian

Today's sound bite comes from Lara Setrakian, an entrepreneur, journalist, and founder of Syria Deeply—a website devoted to delivering consistent and high-quality information surrounding the conflict in Syria. During her TED New York talk '3 ways to fix a broken news industry', Setrakian discusses the sensationalist stories that inundate our newsfeed as well as the lack of high quality reporting. If you haven't listened yet, please do. Setrakian effectively delivers three main takeaways in under nine minutes and leaves the audience in a frantic search for credible news sources that don't shy away from complex issues.

047/365
The Toaster Project

Left to his own devices he couldn’t build a toaster. He could just about make a sandwich and that was it.
— Douglas Adams

Some people make toast every morning; others opt to make the toaster itself. During his 2010 TEDtalk, designer Thomas Thwaites credited Douglas Adams and the sound bite above for the inspiration of the renowned 'The Toaster Project'—his attempt to recreate a £3.94 toaster. If you haven't listened yet, please do. Thwaites delivers a masterfully funny and inspiring lecture on the power of making things from scratch. 

No. 47 of #365SoundBites We Love

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David Attenborough

Could it not be possible to build cities more in harmony with nature? But how – and whether – we decide to invite the wildlife in is up to us.
— Sir David Attenborough

At ESCO Digital we work with individuals and clients to boil down their message into a single sound bite. For 2017 we're excited to share with you 365 of them—one sound bite each day that effectively conveys a message and leaves a lasting impression.

Accompanied by breathtaking cinematography, today's bite comes from Sir David Attenborough, naturalist and iconic narrator of the Planet Earth series. In the most recent episode of Planet Earth II, Attenborough focuses on the wildlife found in cities across the world. From thrilling monkey chase-scenes to heartbreaking turtle hatchling roadkill, this captivating episode will make you feel more aware in your concrete jungle environment.

Watch the Planet Earth series and listen to Sir Attenborough's soothing voice on BBC.

045/365
From 'To Fall in Love With Anyone, Do This'

Ours was the kind of accelerated intimacy I remembered from summer camp, staying up all night with a new friend, exchanging the details of our short lives.
— Mandy Len Catron

At ESCO Digital we work with individuals and clients to boil down their message into a single sound bite. For 2017 we're excited to share with you 365 of them—one sound bite each day that effectively conveys a message and leaves a lasting impression.

No. 45 is a favorite line from Catron's New York Times essay, "To Fall in Love With Anyone, Do This", where she describes the intimacy created by answering psychologist Arthur Aron's popular '36 questions that lead to love'. 

Listen to the Modern Love podcast—or read the full study if you're so inclined.